Loss Prevention – Lay-up and re-commissioning of ships and mobile offshore units

(www.MaritimeCyprus.com) When the market moves back from a downturn, vessels are leaving the lay-up buoys and the focus shifts from preservation to recommissioning. One of the reputable Classification societies has accumulated its best practices into a revised Recommended Practice (RP) containing a new approach for assurance of non-class equipment and systems during recommissioning.

Through 2018 and to date we have seen signs of careful optimism in both the shipping and offshore markets. Based on Lloyd’s List intelligence, the number of inactive vessels has reduced – from about 850 vessels in early 2018 to some 800 inactive vessels as of today.

For many operators and shipyards with laid-up vessels, this has brought both opportunities and challenges in terms of how well the vessel has been maintained or preserved during the lay-up period. The quality of maintenance and preservation is a determining factor when bringing back the vessel effectively into operation. This Classification society has worked with a broad range of ship and MOU owners and operators on implementing cost-effective practices for preservation and recommissioning. Below are some typical challenges observed from this experience:

  1. The preservation execution log was not properly registered, and required actions for dedicated equipment and systems for recommissioning were not prepared systematically. This made it very difficult to prepare a good recommissioning plan.
  2. Compatibility of additive added to the system was not properly evaluated in advance. Some of the additives damaged the hydraulic system. Picture 1 shows a hydraulic system in need of overhaul due to the acidity created after the wrong preservation liquid was applied.
  3. Lack of turning/preservation for key rotating machinery was not covered by class scope. Hence, the system needed be completely overhauled /renewed upon recommissioning. Picture 2 was taken from a survey report and shows the overhauled condition of a tug winch after 18 months of cold lay-up without a proper routine of rotating and maintenance.

The new, updated guide has introduced a dedicated section to respond to the challenges during recommissioning of ships and mobile offshore units, with a focus on equipment not covered by class scope. 

To download the guide, click on below image.

Source: DNVGL

 

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